HISTORICAL MINIATURES BY GEORGE GRASSE
WORLD WAR 1 SEAPLANES IN 1:48 SCALE

HANSA-BRANDENBURG MODEL CC SINGLE-SEAT FLYING BOAT FIGHTER

by George Grasse

LONE STAR MODELS 1:48 SCALE RESIN KIT LX0025 OF THE HANSA-BRANDENBURG CC

HANSA-BRANDENBURG CC THREE-VIEW DRAWINGS

This 3-view drawing is credited to J. D. Carrick or F. Yeoman and appeared in Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War compiled by W. M. Lamberton and published by Harleyford Publications Limited.  This was the basic flying boat design that dominated the Adriatic Theater during World War 1.   The "CC" was a German design not adopted by the Kriegsmarine because their airmen preferred the high-riding twin-float types. 



CONSTRUCTION PHOTO No. 1
19 April 2014
    
COCKPIT DETAILS: The fuselage and the cockpit top decking are the two main pieces shown above.  The seat was a kit accessory but the seatbelts were added from my PE stores.  All of the cockpit detail was added from plastic stock, solder wire, and PE gauges.  The instrument panel is .010 sheet plastic onto which are glued various instruments from several different kits. 

In the cockpit starting at the upper left is the spent ammunition cartridge case container (the top is not detailed); next, an Eduard PE compass mounted on stock plastic; above it is a small PE part and plastic electrical box from which is a short piece of solder wire; below it, is a smaller utility box; the "tee" rod running across the cockpit floor is the aileron housing; the small box with hole is for the control stick; on the near inside wall is an oval magneto box with a dial and switch; forward of that is the live ammunition box (the top not completed - it won't be seen).

 

CONSTRUCTION PHOTO No. 2
20 April 2014
    
THE COMPLETED COCKPIT PAINTED: Paint certainly livens the interior.  The base color of the interior is Vallejo VC0856 Ochre Brown.  The seat is Vallejo VC0914 Green Ochre and the belts are Vallejo VC0819 Iraqi Sand highlighted by Vallejo VC0864 Natural Steel.  The grey-colored items are my mix of Grey-Green, the type of paint used on metal.  The fuel pressure pump is brass with small wood handles.  Behind the seat is the brass fuel tank with brown straps. 
 
  
CONSTRUCTION PHOTO No. 3
22 April 2014
    
COCKPIT SEALED AND TAIL WORK BEGINS: The front deck fits nicely over the cockpit with the narrow seam needing a little putty.  For that I used Vallejo's Acrylic Putty which includes marble dust and titanium white.   The fin and rudder are one part and attached using super glue.  Not included in the kit is the underside fin which I made from plastic sheet stock.
 
  
CONSTRUCTION PHOTO No. 4
24 April 2014
    
SANDING THE FRONT DECK AND MORE TAIL WORK:  The a seam between the front deck and hull is nearly invisible after sanding with 100 then 400 sand paper.  The tail unit is structurally completed with the addition of the horizontal tailplane supported by two brass rods on each side.  A future step involves drilling holes for the elevators through the horizontal stabilizer and then into the hull.  The rudder cables will go directly into the hull.
 
  
CONSTRUCTION PHOTOS No. 5a and 5b
12 May 2014
    
BUILDING THE ENGINE TRESTLE - PART 1:  The top photo (5a) shows the first step in building the trestle.   The engine was the deciding factor or, I should say, the engine's propeller.  There has to be a fair amount of clearance for it.  I drilled four holes into the top of the hull for the main struts.  There are two engine bearers made from square plastic stock, wide enough for pre-drilled holes for the main trestle struts and just narrow enough to support the engine.  Getting the correct spacing between the struts and at the correct height took several experiments using brass rod. 

The bottom photo (5b) shows all of the components glued in place.  I should add that the struts had to be faired over.  You can just make out the difference in strut widths by comparing 5a to 5b.  Before final gluing, I measured each strut from the top of the hull to the bottom of the engine bearers.  This would be the length of the fairings.  To make them, I used Albion ABAMBT18 Brass Micro Tube 1.8mm OD, 1.6mm ID x 12" (3).  I inserted a dummy piece of brass rod and hammered the tube into an aerodynamic shape.  The four fairings where placed over their corresponding struts before any gluing took place.     
 
  
   
 
   
  
-------------------------------  TO BE CONTINUED ------------------------------
 
 

Additional after-market kits used in the creation of this model:
 
    Albion Alloys Brass Tube MBT18 1.8mm OD x 1.6mm ID
    Andrea, Vallejo, and Misterkit acrylic paints as noted
    Griffon Models GMBH02 Brass Tube .5mm OD, .33mm ID (turnbuckles)
    Griffon Models GMBH05 Brass Tube 1.2mm OD, .96mm ID (cabane struts)
       

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Bibliography:

Gray, Peter and Owen Thetford.  German Aircraft of the First World War.  London: Putnam & Company Limited, 1962.

Haddow, George.  "George Haddow's Guide to WWI Austro-Hungarian Naval Aeroplanes", Windsock International, Volume 23, Number 4, July/August 2007.

Herris, Jack.  German Seaplane Fighters of WWI.  Aeronaut Books, 2012.

Lamberton, W. M., Compiler, and E. F. Cheesman, Editor.  Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War.   Letchworth, Herts, UK: Harleyford Publications Limited, 1960.

Leaman, Paul, compiler.  "Atlas Deutscher und Ausl�ndischer Seeflugzeuge", Cross & Cockade International, Volume 41, Issue 4, Winter 2010.

Nelson, Stephen.  "Austrian Naval Aircraft", Cross & Cockade US, Volume 7, Number 2

 

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