HISTORICAL MINIATURES BY GEORGE GRASSE
WORLD WAR 1 AIRCRAFT IN 1:48 SCALE

 

RUMPLER C.IV C.1454/17 of FA(A) 209, 1917

by George Grasse

JAGER MINIATURES 1:48 SCALE RESIN KIT JMJA01

 
UNDER CONSTRUCTION PHOTO #1
22 July 2010
LEFT SIDE VIEW: The Jager Miniatures Rumpler C.IV fuselage is a one-piece resin casting.  In this view, the engine has been set in place and the tail unit and tailskid are glued.   The cockpit floorboard has to be completed and then slipped into the bottom and glued.  See next photo.
 
 
 
UNDER CONSTRUCTION PHOTO #2
22 July 2010
TOP VIEW: The Jager Miniatures Rumpler C.IV fuselage shown above and various cockpit components below (left to right): instrument panel, cockpit floorboard (rudder bar, seat on top of main fuel tank, bomb stowage, opening for camera, observer's seat), enhanced W/T set, scratch-built camera, and trailing antenna spool.
 
 
 
UNDER CONSTRUCTION PHOTO #3
24 August 2010
LEFT SIDE VIEW: At this stage 1) the lower wings have been glued in place with the aid of brass rods for strength; 2) each landing gear "V" strut was constructed from flattened brass tube, bent to shape, held together with a brass rod axle over which an axle foil was glued made from sheet lead; 3) the tail unit was straight forward except that brass rod was used for the reinforcing struts instead of the kit's resin rod material; 4) the observer's gun ring (not visible in this photo) was added using .030 solder, then primed and painted; 5) the cabane trestle was constructed with one side being the kit's white metal part and the other side made from one flattened brass tube bent in two places to match; this makes for a strong support structure.  See next photo.      
 
 
 
 
UNDER CONSTRUCTION PHOTO #4
24 August 2010
OVERHEAD VIEW: This view shows the application of a "lightened" mix of Misterkit MKGC02 Albatros Mauve mixed with MKGC10 German CDL.  Note the slightly more enclosed observer's gun ring as compared to the unaltered version shown in photo #2 above.  Also added to the gun ring is the hand hold for manually rotating the gun ring and the brass tube "post" into which the Parabellum gun pintle will fit.    Also note the compass on the right wing near the fuselage.   Elevator and rudder control horns are from  Eduard's PE sheet.  See close-up in next photo.
 
 
 
UNDER CONSTRUCTION PHOTO #5
24 August 2010
CLOSE-UP VIEW: Note the compass, gun ring, and pre-drilled holes in the wing for struts and rigging.
 
 
 
UNDER CONSTRUCTION PHOTO #6
26 August 2010
I had to show the detail of the Copper State Parabellum machine gun.  The oversize trigger guard could accommodate the observer's heavy gloves.  The projection at the rear on the gun's stock is the gun's butt stock travel cradle used during take-off and landing to prevent the gun from swinging and injuring the observer.
 
 
 
UNDER CONSTRUCTION PHOTOS #7a & 7b
7 September 2010
RIGHT REAR AND LEFT FRONT VIEWS: These photos show the application of the camouflage scheme using Misterkit Albatros Dark Green and a modified version of Misterkit Albatros Mauve lightened with Misterkit German CDL. Decals for the serial number, weight table, and unique triangular marking were made by me using "blue" clear decal paper printed from an HP laser jet.  Eisernes Kreuzen on the fuselage and rudder were from the kit.  I hand-painted the manufacturer's ID plate at the nose and the rigging packet at the forward wing root both of which are shown in the right photo.  See next photo for more details.
 
 
 
UNDER CONSTRUCTION PHOTO #8
7 September 2010
ELEVATED RIGHT SIDE CLOSE-UP: This view shows details added to the aircraft not supplied in the kit.  At the observer's cockpit are the scratch-built flare pistol and flare cartridge rack .  The two black projections between the cockpits are the auxiliary fuel tank intake and vent ports.  On the right wing is the compass partially enclosed in a hood; note the wing walk and holes for wing struts and rigging.  To the front right of the pilot's cockpit is the cocking lever for the Spandau fixed machine gun which is protruding from the fuselage next to the engine.  The large Mercedes D.IVa engine and other structural features did not allow the Spandau to be positioned nearer the pilot which would make cocking the weapon easier.
 
 
 
UNDER CONSTRUCTION PHOTO #9
7 September 2010
RIGHT SIDE VIEW: The Jager Miniatures Rumpler C.IV fuselage shown above and various cockpit components below (left to right): instrument panel, cockpit floorboard (rudder bar, seat on top of main fuel tank, bomb stowage, opening for camera, observer's seat), enhanced W/T set, scratch-built camera, and trailing antenna spool.
 
 
 
FINISHED PHOTOS
15 September 2010

   

--------------------------------  FINIS -----------------------------------

This aircraft model is based on two photographs appearing in Rumpler C.IV Windsock Datafile 35 (WDF035) page 6 and one photo appearing in The French Air Service War Chronology 1914-1918 (FASWC) in the main photo section (approximately page 16 therein).  The aircraft was flown by Uffz. Straumer (P) and Ltn d R Helmet Joeden (O) of FA(A) 209 and was shot down near Craimaille by French pilot Sous/Lt Covin flying a SPAD VII of Escadrille SPA.31.  The German crew were captured and made POW but  Ltn d R Joeden managed to escape. 

 Photo Credits: Rumpler C.IV Windsock Datafile 35 by Peter M. Grosz

One WDF035 photo shows the right side of the aircraft in original German markings.  The other photo shows the left side but all German markings have been removed and substituted with French markings.  The French Air Service War Chronology 1914-1918 photo shows the left side of the aircraft still in German markings.  Two items caught my eye: 1) the small cone-shaped spinner was a German modification substantiated by the FASWC photo; and, 2) the unique triangles within a large triangle in presumably black and white.

 Photo Credit: The French Air Service War Chronology 1914-1918 Frank W. Bailey and Christopher Cony.

References:

Grosz, Peter M.  Rumpler C.IV, Windsock Datafile 35, color profiles and "Colours & Markings" section by Ray Rimmel, scale drawings by Ian R. Stair, published by Albatros Publications Ltd, Berkhamsted, UK, 1992.

Bailey, Frank W. and Christopher Cony.  The French Air Service War Chronology 1914-1918.  published by Grub Street, London, 2001.

Gray, Peter and Owen Thetford.  German Aircraft of the First World War, scale drawings by George Haddow, published by Putnam & Company Limited, London, 1962.

 

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Copyright by George Grasse